images.duckduckgo.com

By Nancy Folbre,

Researchers studying income distribution in the United States seem reluctant to acknowledge the family as an important unit of production and distribution. As a result, they often rely on statistics that provide a misleading picture of inequalities based on class, race or ethnicity, and especially gender.

Incomplete definitions of both family and income either obscure or render invisible transfers between and within households, including the value of housework and family care. Evidence from specialized surveys—such as the Health and Retirement Survey, the Panel Survey of Income Dynamics, the Survey of Income and Program Participation, and the American Time Use Survey—clearly demonstrate the quantitative relevance of these omissions.

Read rest here

Latest Tweets

  • “There is an immediate need to think long term” Manuel Pastor on political lessons from California #ASSA2020
    3 weeks ago
  • URPE parties like there's no tomorrow #ASSA2020 https://t.co/NptJq6ZRyX
    3 weeks ago
  • The URPE membership meeting that was listed in the ASSA program for this afternoon will not be happening. Please jo… https://t.co/yUNO9SsU5B
    3 weeks ago